Can you smell your pet’s breath from across the room? This could be the beginning sign of dental problems. Preventative veterinary dental care can save your pet pain and you money in the long run. February is Pet Dental Health Month and is designed to raise awareness that pets need to brush their teeth regularly, just like their owners. That is why for this February, we are offering $50 off dental cleaning and a free small bag of dental formula.

While brushing teeth is a part of your daily routine, a lot of owners forget about regular maintenance of their pet’s teeth. Unfortunately, dental disease can go undetected for a long time before it’s treated and is one of the most common problems veterinarians face. Dental infection can spread to the heart, kidney, and other organs and suddenly become life threatening. Practice good dental hygiene at home, in addition to regular vet checkups. It’s the best and most efficient way to keep your pets comfortably, healthy, and pain-free.

Below are some signs you can watch for. If you notice them take your pet to your vet immediately

  • Bad breath—Most pets have breath that is less than fresh, but if it becomes truly repugnant, similar to the smell of a rotten egg, it’s a sign that periodontal disease has already started.
  • Bleeding from the mouth.
  • Red swollen gums and brownish teeth.
  • frequent pawing or rubbing at the face and/or mouth.
  • Reluctance to eat hard foods—for example, picking it up and then spitting it out.

 

If your pet isn’t used to having their teeth brushed, then it may take awhile for them to warm up to the idea. You should start slowly and it’s okay if you just brush one or two teeth the first time. Pet toothbrushes have smaller, softer, bristles and a smaller head than human brushes. You don’t need to use toothpaste, but if you do, then you should use pet paste, as human toothpaste can be dangerous for your pets and make them sick. You’ll have to approach your pet when he or she’s relaxed. Sit with them in a quiet location and speak in a soothing voice. Next put the toothbrush to their mouth and move gently around. It’s not necessary to brush your pets’ teeth for as long as you would your own. After all, they don’t eat as much junk as humans do! Usually a few seconds of well rounded light scrubbing is enough to dissolve the plaque and prevent future build-up. Brush your pet’s teeth about once a week and if you notice extra build up take your pet to the veterinarian for a professional clean. If your pet’s teeth are a constant problem, try using dental kibble which you can pick up at your local vet clinic.

If you’d like to schedule an appointment for your pet’s cleaning then give us a call or contact us HERE.